Italian Bellini Cocktail

Bellini is an Italian  long drink par excellence, based on peach puree and sparkling white wine. This cocktail was conceived in 1948 by Giuseppe Cipriani, owner of the well-known Harry’s Bar in Venice

 INGREDIENTS

3 1/4 oz 10 cl prosecco

1 1/4 oz 5 cl peach puree

 As you can see, the ratio of the two ingredients is 1 to 2. This allows you to easily prepare it in different quantities (perhaps for an aperitif with friends, to be offered in comfortable and fresh carafes).

Giuseppe Cipriani conceived this mix by merging two typical products of his region: the precious white peach of Verona and prosecco.

So, he took the prosecco and mixed the peach pulp and since the rosy color that came out reminded him of the dress of a saint in a painting he thought well of giving this drink the name of the painter of this work: Giovanni Bellini, Italian painter citizen of the Republic of Venice, one of the most famous artists of the Renaissance, also known by the name Giambellino. Or perhaps Cipriani simply dedicated this long drink to the inauguration of the pictorial exhibition of the artist Giovanni Bellini.

PROCEDURE:

Wash the peaches, dry them, cut them into wedges and remove the stone. Crush the peaches. The juice obtained should be mixed slowly and gently with the prosecco, so that the latter does not lose the gas that distinguishes it. Finally, the Bellini cocktail must be served in an elegant flute. Interestingly, the white peach season is between May and September in Italy. Bars in Venice therefore take the opportunity to use fresh peaches for their Bellini cocktails instead of frozen puree. So, the bars choose to sell the Bellini cocktail only between May and October.

There are many variations to this recipe and the most famous is the Bellini Royal, which involves the use of champagne instead of prosecco.

Cin cin! Salute !

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.